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Coffee Brewing Chemistry: Hot Brew vs. Cold Brew
Hot or cold, temperature won’t stop many from obtaining their caffeine fix. Depending on the weather and personal preferences, coffee drinkers at home can brew coffee by one of two ways: hot brew or cold brew. On the surface, the distinctions between the two methods seem self-explanatory. Read more…
Photo Credit: Nick Webb (nickwebb/Flickr)

Coffee Brewing Chemistry: Hot Brew vs. Cold Brew

Hot or cold, temperature won’t stop many from obtaining their caffeine fix. Depending on the weather and personal preferences, coffee drinkers at home can brew coffee by one of two ways: hot brew or cold brew. On the surface, the distinctions between the two methods seem self-explanatory. Read more…

Photo Credit: Nick Webb (nickwebb/Flickr)

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Scrumptious Strawberries & Caffeine Jitters
Supermarket strawberries have become bland through decades of agriculture, so now scientists are figuring out how to bring its flavor back. In the meantime, that banana isn’t going to help with your caffeine jitters. What we’re reading…

Scrumptious Strawberries & Caffeine Jitters

Supermarket strawberries have become bland through decades of agriculture, so now scientists are figuring out how to bring its flavor back. In the meantime, that banana isn’t going to help with your caffeine jitters. What we’re reading…

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Fruit Salad Science
There are very few limits on what can be a fruit salad ingredient. If the object in question is fruit, it can go in. Segregating fruit from non-fruit seems simple, but from a botanical point of view, classifying these sweet and juicy plant products gets complicated. But, if armed with knowledge and lemon juice, anyone can achieve this delicious and vibrant potluck offering. Read on…
Photo Credit: Jo Christian Oterhals (Flickr/jcoterhals)

Fruit Salad Science

There are very few limits on what can be a fruit salad ingredient. If the object in question is fruit, it can go in. Segregating fruit from non-fruit seems simple, but from a botanical point of view, classifying these sweet and juicy plant products gets complicated. But, if armed with knowledge and lemon juice, anyone can achieve this delicious and vibrant potluck offering. Read on…

Photo Credit: Jo Christian Oterhals (Flickr/jcoterhals)

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Flavor of the Month: Vinegar
Vinegar is an aqueous solution that contains acetic acid and water. Historically, vinegars were often produced by exposing wine to contamination by harmless, airborne bacteria known as Acetobacter. Vinegar has a plethora of culinary applications and serves as an effective food preservative and delicious sour condiment. From soup dumplings to pickles, vinegar is here to stay! Read more…
Photo: Kinilaw: A Filipino style fish ceviche cured in coconut vinegarPhoto Credit: Jimmy Sianipar

Flavor of the Month: Vinegar

Vinegar is an aqueous solution that contains acetic acid and water. Historically, vinegars were often produced by exposing wine to contamination by harmless, airborne bacteria known as Acetobacter. Vinegar has a plethora of culinary applications and serves as an effective food preservative and delicious sour condiment. From soup dumplings to pickles, vinegar is here to stay! Read more…

Photo: Kinilaw: A Filipino style fish ceviche cured in coconut vinegar
Photo Credit: Jimmy Sianipar

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Plant-based Foods & Soylent
On one hand, the future of food could very well be plant-based alternatives to meet the growing global demand for meat. On the other hand, the end of food might be found in Soylent.  What we’re reading…

Plant-based Foods & Soylent

On one hand, the future of food could very well be plant-based alternatives to meet the growing global demand for meat. On the other hand, the end of food might be found in Soylent.  What we’re reading…

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Flavor without the Calories: Scientists Create a Digital Taste Simulator
Think of any task and chances are someone is developing a new mobile electronic device for it. Technologies exist that pay for your coffee, track your UV light exposure, and even drive your car, but can one also simulate flavor? With that question in mind, scientists led by Nimesha Ranasinghe at the National University of Singapore are developing a device that can scintillate your tongue with sour, bitter, salty, and sweet tastes without the use of any chemicals or actual food. Read more…
Photo Courtesy: Ranasinghe, N. et al. 2012. Tongue mounted interface for digitally actuating the sense of taste. 2012 16th Annual International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISWC): 80-87

Flavor without the Calories: Scientists Create a Digital Taste Simulator

Think of any task and chances are someone is developing a new mobile electronic device for it. Technologies exist that pay for your coffee, track your UV light exposure, and even drive your car, but can one also simulate flavor? With that question in mind, scientists led by Nimesha Ranasinghe at the National University of Singapore are developing a device that can scintillate your tongue with sour, bitter, salty, and sweet tastes without the use of any chemicals or actual food. Read more…

Photo Courtesy: Ranasinghe, N. et al. 2012. Tongue mounted interface for digitally actuating the sense of taste. 2012 16th Annual International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISWC): 80-87

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Profile: Michael Voltaggio
Michael Voltaggio is the winner of Top Chef Season 6 and the owner and head chef of ink. in Los Angeles. Michael is known for his adventurous cooking, melding his classical repertoire with unconventional techniques. Read more…

Profile: Michael Voltaggio

Michael Voltaggio is the winner of Top Chef Season 6 and the owner and head chef of ink. in Los Angeles. Michael is known for his adventurous cooking, melding his classical repertoire with unconventional techniques. Read more…

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DIY Kitchen Science: Beer Crust Apple Pie
Adding alcohol to a pie crust is a fairly mainstream way of obtaining a nice flaky shelter for a delicious filling within. One team at the 2014 Scientific Bake-Off, team P.I.E. (Pretty Intense Enthusiasts), was intrigued by the plethora of alcoholic options available to them for pie crusts, and chose to use their scientific prowess to determine the best choice. Two variables guided their experiment: how do carbonation and alcohol concentration affect the flakiness of a pie crust? Read more…
Photo Credit: Patrick Tran

DIY Kitchen Science: Beer Crust Apple Pie

Adding alcohol to a pie crust is a fairly mainstream way of obtaining a nice flaky shelter for a delicious filling within. One team at the 2014 Scientific Bake-Off, team P.I.E. (Pretty Intense Enthusiasts), was intrigued by the plethora of alcoholic options available to them for pie crusts, and chose to use their scientific prowess to determine the best choice. Two variables guided their experiment: how do carbonation and alcohol concentration affect the flakiness of a pie crust? Read more…

Photo Credit: Patrick Tran

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DIY Kitchen Science: Crumbalicious Apple Pie
This duo of student scientists aimed to create a pie with the crunchiest apple filling by experimenting with four different types of apples: Granny Smith, Red Delicious, Pink Lady, and Fuji. To determine which apples had the greatest resistance to applied forces (and thus remained crunchiest), they measured both the force required to cut through each kind of apple and the “elastic modulus”, which is the amount of deformation caused by a given force. Read more…
Photo Courtesy: Patrick Tran

DIY Kitchen Science: Crumbalicious Apple Pie

This duo of student scientists aimed to create a pie with the crunchiest apple filling by experimenting with four different types of apples: Granny Smith, Red Delicious, Pink Lady, and Fuji. To determine which apples had the greatest resistance to applied forces (and thus remained crunchiest), they measured both the force required to cut through each kind of apple and the “elastic modulus”, which is the amount of deformation caused by a given force. Read more…

Photo Courtesy: Patrick Tran

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DIY Kitchen Science: Perfectly Unsoggy Apple Pie
If you’ve baked an apple pie, you have probably encountered the dreaded problem of a soggy pie crust. At this year’s Science of Pie event, the student scientists of Team On the Road sought to solve this pie-baking mishap by determining the optimal apple slice thickness; the idea was that apple slices of varying thickness would release different  amounts of water when baked, with more water released giving rise to a soggy crust. Read more…
Photo Courtesy: (A) & (B): Patrick Tran, (C): Team on the Road

DIY Kitchen Science: Perfectly Unsoggy Apple Pie

If you’ve baked an apple pie, you have probably encountered the dreaded problem of a soggy pie crust. At this year’s Science of Pie event, the student scientists of Team On the Road sought to solve this pie-baking mishap by determining the optimal apple slice thickness; the idea was that apple slices of varying thickness would release different  amounts of water when baked, with more water released giving rise to a soggy crust. Read more…

Photo Courtesy: (A) & (B): Patrick Tran, (C): Team on the Road