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Saving Oranges & Growing Cherries
The life of a fruit can be pretty exciting. Oranges have hope from infections through gene modification and cherry trees get a boost from space rays. What we’re reading…

Saving Oranges & Growing Cherries

The life of a fruit can be pretty exciting. Oranges have hope from infections through gene modification and cherry trees get a boost from space rays. What we’re reading…

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Texture and Color of Sashimi
Whether or not you like eating sashimi, such a fine specimen of fish is undeniably an incredibly beautiful food. The subtle flavors, delicate texture and vivid colors make sushi and sashimi such a unique eating experience. Here are some bits of sashimi science we learned from Ole G. Mouritsen’s book, Sushi: Food for the Eye, the Body, and the Soul. Read more…
Photo Credit: sake puppets/Flickr

Texture and Color of Sashimi

Whether or not you like eating sashimi, such a fine specimen of fish is undeniably an incredibly beautiful food. The subtle flavors, delicate texture and vivid colors make sushi and sashimi such a unique eating experience. Here are some bits of sashimi science we learned from Ole G. Mouritsen’s book, Sushi: Food for the Eye, the Body, and the Soul. Read more…

Photo Credit: sake puppets/Flickr

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Flavor of the Month: Wasabi
That green dollop that accompanies sushi comes from the wasabi plant, also known as Japanese horseradish, which is not to be confused with its distant cousin, the more common and well-known European horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). Real wasabi is made by grating the wasabi rhizome into a fine powder. Read more…
Photo credit: Jun OHWADA (しそ山葵) (june29/Flickr)

Flavor of the Month: Wasabi

That green dollop that accompanies sushi comes from the wasabi plant, also known as Japanese horseradish, which is not to be confused with its distant cousin, the more common and well-known European horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). Real wasabi is made by grating the wasabi rhizome into a fine powder. Read more…

Photo credit: Jun OHWADA (しそ山葵) (june29/Flickr)

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Science of Sushi & Sushi in Space
Dr. Ole G. Mouritsen discusses his book Sushi: Food for the Eye, the Body, and the Soul, and astronaut Soichi Noguchi prepares sushi aboard the ISS. What we’re reading…

Science of Sushi & Sushi in Space

Dr. Ole G. Mouritsen discusses his book Sushi: Food for the Eye, the Body, and the Soul, and astronaut Soichi Noguchi prepares sushi aboard the ISS. What we’re reading…

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Profile: Morihiro Onodera
Chef Morihiro Onodera trained as a sushi chef in Tokyo, and at seminal Los Angeles restaurants including Katsu, R-23, Matsuhisa, and Takao as well as Hatsuhana in NY. By the time he opened his first restaurant, Mori Sushi in Los Angeles, he was preparing many of the same handmade ingredients, harvesting his own locally grown rice and creating handmade pottery to be used in the restaurant. After selling Mori Sushi in 2011, Mori began creating handmade pottery for several Michelin Guide restaurants in Los Angeles and established a partnership with rice farmer, Ichiro Tamaki. Tamaki farms in Uruguay will harvest its first crop in May of 2013 and will be available for distribution world-wide. Read more…
See Morihiro Onodera April 23, 2014 at “The Science of Sushi”
Photo credit: LA Eater

Profile: Morihiro Onodera

Chef Morihiro Onodera trained as a sushi chef in Tokyo, and at seminal Los Angeles restaurants including Katsu, R-23, Matsuhisa, and Takao as well as Hatsuhana in NY. By the time he opened his first restaurant, Mori Sushi in Los Angeles, he was preparing many of the same handmade ingredients, harvesting his own locally grown rice and creating handmade pottery to be used in the restaurant. After selling Mori Sushi in 2011, Mori began creating handmade pottery for several Michelin Guide restaurants in Los Angeles and established a partnership with rice farmer, Ichiro Tamaki. Tamaki farms in Uruguay will harvest its first crop in May of 2013 and will be available for distribution world-wide. Read more…

See Morihiro Onodera April 23, 2014 at “The Science of Sushi”

Photo credit: LA Eater

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Profile: Ole G. Mouritsen
Ole G. Mouritsen is a professor of molecular biophysics at the University of Southern Denmark. His research concentrates on basic science and its practical applications to biotechnology, biomedicine, gastrophysics, and gastronomy. He is an elected member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, The Danish Academy of Technical Sciences, and the Danish Gastronomical Academy. His books include Life: As a Matter of Fat; Sushi: Food for the Eye, the Body, and the Soul; Seaweeds: Edible, Available, and Sustainable and Umami. Unlocking the Secrets of the Fifth Taste. Read more…
See Ole G. Mouritsen April 23, 2014 at “The Science of Sushi”

Profile: Ole G. Mouritsen

Ole G. Mouritsen is a professor of molecular biophysics at the University of Southern Denmark. His research concentrates on basic science and its practical applications to biotechnology, biomedicine, gastrophysics, and gastronomy. He is an elected member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, The Danish Academy of Technical Sciences, and the Danish Gastronomical Academy. His books include Life: As a Matter of FatSushi: Food for the Eye, the Body, and the SoulSeaweeds: Edible, Available, and Sustainable and Umami. Unlocking the Secrets of the Fifth Taste. Read more…

See Ole G. Mouritsen April 23, 2014 at “The Science of Sushi”

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Science & Food 2014 Undergraduate Course
This week marks the beginning of UCLA’s Spring Quarter, which can only mean one thing… It’s time for the Science & Food undergraduate course! We have a stellar lineup of chefs and farmers slated for our third annual offering of Science & Food: The Physical and Molecular Origins of What We Eat. Although the course is only open to current UCLA students, we will be posting highlights from the course right here on the blog. Until then, check out this year’s course speakers and brush up on some of the great science we’ve learned in past courses. Read more…
And don’t forget: the Science & Food 2014 Public Lecture Series is fast approaching, so be sure to get your tickets before they sell out. Hope to see you all there!

Science & Food 2014 Undergraduate Course

This week marks the beginning of UCLA’s Spring Quarter, which can only mean one thing… It’s time for the Science & Food undergraduate course! We have a stellar lineup of chefs and farmers slated for our third annual offering of Science & Food: The Physical and Molecular Origins of What We Eat. Although the course is only open to current UCLA students, we will be posting highlights from the course right here on the blog. Until then, check out this year’s course speakers and brush up on some of the great science we’ve learned in past courses. Read more…

And don’t forget: the Science & Food 2014 Public Lecture Series is fast approaching, so be sure to get your tickets before they sell out. Hope to see you all there!

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Pizza Nanophysics & The Bacon Genome
As we saw earlier this week, scientific progress can collide with the food world in some truly unexpected ways. Continuing this theme, pizza tossing helps nanophysicists design tiny motors, while pig genome research holds the key to tastier bacon. What we’re reading…

Pizza Nanophysics & The Bacon Genome

As we saw earlier this week, scientific progress can collide with the food world in some truly unexpected ways. Continuing this theme, pizza tossing helps nanophysicists design tiny motors, while pig genome research holds the key to tastier bacon. What we’re reading…

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Sky-High Spuds
In the not-so-distant future, surfing the web at 35,000 feet will be just as reliable as going online at your favorite coffee shop. Who do we thank for this aeronautical innovation? Teams of engineers have been leading the charge to bring us quality in-flight internet, but there’s another WiFi hero you probably didn’t expect… potatoes! Read more…
Photo credit: Boeing

Sky-High Spuds

In the not-so-distant future, surfing the web at 35,000 feet will be just as reliable as going online at your favorite coffee shop. Who do we thank for this aeronautical innovation? Teams of engineers have been leading the charge to bring us quality in-flight internet, but there’s another WiFi hero you probably didn’t expect… potatoes! Read more…

Photo credit: Boeing

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DIY Kitchen Science: Tri-Color Potato Salad
Alex Weiser digs potatoes. Literally.
As a grower for Weiser Family Farms, Alex Weiser is known for his year-round supply of tasty (and colorful) potatoes. All Reds, Butterballs, Purple Peruvians, Red Thumbs, and Russian Banana Fingerlings adorn Weiser’s farmers’ market stalls across Southern California. So when Weiser stopped by the 2013 Science & Food course, he just had to bring a classic potato salad for everyone to try.
And what a potato salad it was! With yellow, purple, and red potatoes, Weiser’s tri-color potato salad was as visually appealing as it was delicious. Eating that potato salad got us thinking about the molecules responsible for the creamy yellows, bright reds, and deep purples of Weiser’s potatoes. Although many colorful molecules give potatoes their vibrant hues, all of these molecules represent just two large classes of chemical pigments known as carotenoids and anthocyanins. Read more…
Photo credit: A.J. Kandy (A.J. Kandy/Flickr)

DIY Kitchen Science: Tri-Color Potato Salad

Alex Weiser digs potatoes. Literally.

As a grower for Weiser Family Farms, Alex Weiser is known for his year-round supply of tasty (and colorful) potatoes. All Reds, Butterballs, Purple Peruvians, Red Thumbs, and Russian Banana Fingerlings adorn Weiser’s farmers’ market stalls across Southern California. So when Weiser stopped by the 2013 Science & Food course, he just had to bring a classic potato salad for everyone to try.

And what a potato salad it was! With yellow, purple, and red potatoes, Weiser’s tri-color potato salad was as visually appealing as it was delicious. Eating that potato salad got us thinking about the molecules responsible for the creamy yellows, bright reds, and deep purples of Weiser’s potatoes. Although many colorful molecules give potatoes their vibrant hues, all of these molecules represent just two large classes of chemical pigments known as carotenoids and anthocyanins. Read more…

Photo credit: A.J. Kandy (A.J. Kandy/Flickr)